Ghosting the Periphery is a ‘sonic ghosting’ work reflecting on the histories and spaces of the Hatton Gallery in Newcastle-upon-Tyne. It comprises a four channel sound work composed from manipulated, fractured and processed site recordings made in the gallery spaces; a footfall/presence responsive layer of real-time processing which samples and alters granular fragments of the soundscape composition; and a printed text assemblage linking the experience of researching and composing the work to fragmented, cut-up remnants of the gallery archive materials.

The commission was supported by Catalyst Arts, which is funded by Arts Council England, Heritage Lottery Fund and the Department for Culture, Media and Sport.



NARC magazine wrote this:

In 2016, the Hatton Gallery in Newcastle is undergoing a huge transformation. The gallery opened in 1912 and has since hosted hundred of exhibitions as well as welcoming millions of art-loving visitors. The 2016 development will see the gallery undergoing something of a makeover, modernising the space for the twenty-first century. To celebrate the 103 years of the Hatton in its current form, the gallery, alongside Catalyst Arts, commissioned Danny Bright to create a work that celebrates the interior. The result is Ghosting the Periphery, which opened to the public on Wednesday 7th January.
Bright, a sound artist and composer who has exhibited works at the Brighton Digital Festival, V&A and NYCEMF, was chosen because of his connection to Kurt Schwitters, whose Merz Barn Wall is the star piece of the Hatton’s collection. Schwitters pioneered the different uses of sound and text in art, something that Bright himself continues to do in his own experimental works.
During his time researching at the gallery, Bright fell in love with the peripheral spaces of the gallery, areas that surround the galleries but are never usually seen. One such space is the mezzanine above Gallery Four. Bright describes these areas as “sonic palimpsests” or “spaces that resonate with the traces of something that was once there but has since been removed.”
As such, Bright’s work reminds the audience of the multiple layered histories of the gallery itself, while still acknowledging that it is impossible to fully capture the entire picture. A true palimpsest, after all, takes away something from the original piece in the process of adding to it. Ghosting the Periphery therefore encourages visitors to the gallery to listen out for the ghosts of the Hatton, offering an invitation to search for them in the unseen areas and explore alternative approaches to hearing.
Eugene Johnson, Jan 2015


Hatton 1

Hatton 2

Hatton cards